Courses in English

Some of the courses are taught in English (see below). Students can register for some of these courses via Osiris/Studentportal.

Bachelor

Master

CONFLICT AND GOVERNANCE IN AFRICA
Course: MAN-CI 35
Period: 6 September - 22 October 2021
Day/time: Monday and Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: bachelor

Africa is often portrayed as a continent of extremes: Some countries experience extremely rapid economic growth, benefit from abundant resources and see the rise of a middle class, while others encounter chronic political and economic crisis or plunge into civil war, often recurring. Recent outbreaks of violence in the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan seem to confirm the idea that sub-Saharan Africa is plagued by violent conflict rooted in ancient tribal hatreds, manipulated by despotic leaders, and spilling over uncontrollably from one failing state into the other. By analyzing the history and characteristics of governance in sub-Saharan Africa, and exploring how conflict (violent or otherwise) plays a role in this, the course aims to move beyond stereotypes. We will investigate the grey area between the optimistic prospects for Africa's rising economies and the dark images of a continent in poverty and conflict. The course aims to debate trends, conceptualizations and theories about governance and conflict in Africa, analyse these in relation to specific country cases and reflect on framing in the media.

WAR AND STATEBUILDING IN AFGHANISTAN
Course: MAN-CI 43
Period: 8 November - 23 December 2021
Day/time: Monday and Thursday, 10.30 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: bachelor
After twenty years of military involvement, the world's most powerful army failed to prove that it could succeed in Afghanistan. The counterinsurgency strategy has been slow to show the expected results and the Taliban seem to grow stronger as time passes by. The growing disenchantment about this war of necessity is such that many in the United States, Europe, and Afghanistan wonder what its purpose really is. This course acquaints students with the important debates about the war in Afghanistan, focusing on issues such as the decision to engage/disengage in this war or the evolution of the military strategy. Through the study of previous international intervene-tions in Afghanistan students will gain a better understanding of the current Afghan war. Our study of the consequences of the U.S. engagement in Iraq on the war in Afghanistan will provide us with further lessons to apply to the Afghanistan situation. The course also uses the Afghan war as a vehicle for interpreting the politics of international intervention, making sense of the complexity of the Afghan war, by explaining how things really work. The course encourages students to think of the necessary trade-offs among the different goals in Afghanistan, as they try to analyze the complexity of international intervention.

NEGOTIATION AND PEACEMAKING
Course: MAN-CI 39
Period: 31  January - 18 March 2022
Day/time: Monday and Thursday, 13:30 - 15.15 p.m.
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: bachelor
Conflict resolution can be divided between peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peace-building. The category of peacemaking includes processes aiming to stop outright violence, thus allowing peacekeeping and peacebuilding to occur. This class explores the theory and practice of peacemaking, and the process at its core, negotiation. We will explore both traditional hard bargaining negotiation and the process of principled negotiation, and the difficulties associated with each. These theories will be illuminated by examples from case studies from around the world, and from both micro and macro levels. These case studies will also allow us to investigate how culture and conflict dynamics affect negotiation, and how groups can splinter and divide during negotiation, complicating the process. In an ever more complicated world, peacemaking has become an ever more complicated process, this class introduces students to the basic principles and prepares them to better understand how conflicts come to an end.

NATURAL RESOURCES, CONFLICT AND GOVERNANCE
Course: MAN-CI 45
Period: 31 January - 18 March 2022
Day/time: Tuesday and Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 12.15 p.m.
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: bachelor

Intuitively, many of us see a strong connection between natural resources, conflict and sustainable development. Popular and academic debates both underscore the importance of those connections regarding aspects such as: the importance of greed and illegal resource exploitation as a driver of conflicts in eastern DRC or Sierra Leone; the consequences of climate change for urban dwellers in South-East Asia living on slippery slopes; how land grabbing in the South is the result of the quest for land to assure food security or to produce bio-fuels to meet CO2 reduction agreements.
This course starts from the notion that natural resources are very important in people's livelihoods and may be a bone of fierce political contention. However, we should be wary about assuming straightforward relationships between resource scarcity or abundance and political conflict, human (in)security and sustainable development. This course provides an introduction to historical and current debates on the nature of various resources, the ways in which resources are governed, and the politics through which natural resources acquire such an important role in the economy and public imagination. Moreover, the course emphasises the connections that link local challenges of natural resource access, use and competition to global economic trends, the management of global public goods, and global civic activism.

CONFLICT, AID AND DEVELOPMENT
Course: MAN-CIM 44
Period: 31  January - 18 March 2022
Day/time: Friday, 12:45 - 15:15 p.m.
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: master
Admission requirement: bachelor's degree and 24 ECTS conflict or development related courses
In this course, the relationship between foreign aid and conflict will be examined. During the course, students will analyze the effects of multiple types of aid (i.e. emergency aid and development aid) and foreign aid donors (i.e. bilaterals, multilaterals, and private foundations) on all stages of the conflict cycle (prevention, management, and resolution). Central questions to be explored throughout the term include: Can foreign aid exacerbate underlying conflict? Is foreign aid an effective tool of conflict prevention, management and/ or resolution? What programs and activities should international donors fund in countries emerging from violent conflict? All students can attend the course. However, those with no prior knowledge of theories of conflict and conflict resolution will be asked to familiarize themselves with this literature through a list of suggested readings.

CONFLICTING THEORIES: APPLYING THEORETICAL APPROACHES OF CONFLICTS, TERRITORIES AND IDENTITIES
Course: MAN-CIM 27
Period: 6 September - 22 October 2021
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: master
Admission: CTI and CoPoPo master students only

The academic literature offers a variety of theoretical perspectives on the causes and dynamics of contemporary conflicts. These different theories focus on different dimen-sions of conflict, such as the political, the economic or the social, and look for explanations either in structural factors or in the strategies of key actors and at different levels, from the local to the global. Theories rarely give conclusive answers and give rise to a lot of debate. Do conflicts originate from greed or grievance? Does democratization bring peace? Are ethnic differences a source of conflict or an instrument in conflict? In this course we try to understand how theories differ and why the theoretical perspective matters for the study of conflicts. The student will learn to position him or herself in the theoretical debates and will practice in using theoretical perspectives to analyze a particular conflict.
Different theoretical perspectives will be discussed with active participation of the students. Students are expected to read the literature in advance and make short kick-off presentations. The texts in the reader discuss a certain perspective or debate and provide examples of the use of such perspectives in the analysis of particular conflicts. Parallel to the lectures, students will elaborate a case study of a conflict to which they apply the theories discussed. In the final session, students will give a presentation on the basis of their case studies.

POLITICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION: THEORY AND PRACTICE
Course: MAN-CIM 28
Period: 8 November - 23 December 2021
Credits: 6 ECTS
Level: master
Admission: CTI and CoPoPo master students only

Central to this course is the spatial dimension of the different strategies for prevention, management and solution of violent conflicts. Using cases such as the former Yugoslavia, Cyprus, Israel-Palestine and Iraq, an overview is given of the various discourses on and strategies for conflict prevention, management and resolution. The whole spectrum of options, ranging from drawing borders to reforming electoral systems, is treated extensively.
In this course the student becomes acquainted with the various geographical and political strategies for the prevention, management and resolution of violent conflicts. The student learns to recognize the different levels of the spatial dimension of conflict prevention, management and resolution and learns to deconstruct the various discourses on the subject and place them into perspective.