toga's Radboud Universiteit in togakamer

Monitor women professors: proportion of female professors at Radboud University decreased in 2021

According to the Landelijke Monitor Vrouwelijke Hoogleraren 2022 (Women Professors Monitor 2022), 29.2% of professors at Radboud University are women. The monitor uses 31 December 2021 as its reference date, at which time the number of female professors was 1 percentage point less than in 2020 (30.2%)

Radboud University aims to increase this figure to 36% by the end of 2025. While this may seem like a challenge given the current decrease, there is also good news: the number of female associate professors at Radboud University has grown considerably from 28.7% to 37.2%. This group lays the foundation for future professorial appointments.

Dutch universities

The average percentage of female professors at Dutch universities was 26.7% at the end of 2021 compared to 25.7% in 2020. The last five years have seen the lowest average increase in the percentage of female professors. Radboud and two other universities saw a decrease in the percentage of female professors. Overall, ten universities experienced limited growth in the number of female professors and one university remained the same. 

Other academic positions

Radboud University also monitors the inflow, outflow and advancement of female academics in various positions. The proportion of female associate professors increased from 28.7% to 35.2%, despite a decrease the year before. The proportion of female lecturers (46%) and PhD candidates (49.5%) remained more or less the same.

36% by 2025

In 2020, the Executive Board adjusted the target for the number of female professors at Radboud University and Radboud university medical center to 36% by the end of 2025 after the original target of 30% had been met. This target will remain in place despite the current decrease.

“Our goal remains unchanged,” says Rector Magnificus Han van Krieken. “The increase in the number of female associate professors is positive and opens up new opportunities. The number of female academics in other positions is also on the rise, but it’s clear things won’t progress on their own. Better gender distribution requires structural attention and serious efforts. As a board, we are in constant communication with the faculties about this. It’s important to keep in mind that diversity is about more than just the ratio of men and women.”