Jitse Arendsen

Portrait Jitse Arendsen
Studying financial economics encourages students to not only gain proficiency in extensive financial theory but also to actively challenge and improve these theories.
Name
Jitse Arendsen
Programme
Financial Economics
Study start date
Previous education
Economics at Radboud University

Jitse Arendsen is a Master's student Financial Economics.

'I liked the way in which the programme taught us all sorts of different skills such as pitching, critical thinking and all sort of theories. It certainly changed me because it provided me with a far deeper understanding of financial economics and the underlying mechanisms.

During the masters, there was far more interaction between the teachers and the students than during the bachelor track. For example; on several occasions, my fellow students and I had great informal talks with the lecturers during the breaks. I believe that the relative small group size added heavily to this setting.

The master, even more than the bachelors, relies on the students abilities to critically evaluate academic literature. Although this material was sometimes of extremely high quality, we were still expected to find points of improvement. This challenged us to challenge long-standing and awarded economical theories and required combining in-depth knowledge of economics with creative thinking.

I am currently enrolled in a traineeship Risk Management at the Rabobank. My thesis was about financial decision making for others under accountability/limited liability. This thesis was supervised by mister Füllbrunn and allowed me to conduct my own lab experiment in the decision lab.

Studying financial economics at the Radboud University encourages students to not only gain proficiency in extensive financial theory but also to actively challenge and improve these theories. I believe especially this last part could be extremely useful when working in the financial sector. Recent recessions have shown us that commonly accepted financial theories and/or models can be lacking and blindly following them can be dangerous. Financial science is not static and new insight in novel fields such as neuro-economics and behavioural finance are achieved on a daily basis. The stability of the financial system relies on educated professionals using their own judgement and incorporate new insights to provide better models and more sound theories. I am sure that I will be using these skills during my current traineeship Risk Management at the Rabobank and every job that will follow afterwards.'