Zoek in de site...

Citizenship Tests in Germany, the Netherlands and the UK

Title Citizenship Tests in Germany, the Netherlands and the UK
Description

In the past decade, a number of Western European countries have formalised or introduced language and knowledge of society tests for immigrants applying for citizenship, permanent residence or admittance. The aim of the research has been to assess the explicit and hidden goals the formalised language and knowledge of society tests are meant to achieve, as well as to analyse their intended and unintended effects. Its focus lies on citizenship tests, i.e. formalised language and knowledge of society tests as a requirement for naturalisation, and three countries: Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom.

The research answers the question of why the countries under consideration introduced citizenship tests on the basis of an analysis of the political debates preceding the introduction of the tests and the general social and political context in which these debates took place. The question of what effects these tests have produced has been answered on the basis of an analysis of relevant statistics and an analysis of interviews with immigrants and stakeholders. Furthermore, the content of the tests presented to aspiring citizens of Germany, the Netherlands and the UK has been thoroughly analysed.

The book ‘Deserving Citizenship. Citizenship Tests in Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom’ is forthcoming in the ‘immigration and asylum law and policy in Europe’ series of Brill Publishers (http://www.brill.com/publications/immigration-and-asylum-law-and-policy-europe).

Researcher(s)

Ricky van Oers

Supervision
  • Kees Groenendijk and
  • Betty de Hart
Duration

2007 - 2012
public defense: 1 March 2013

Funding Centre for Migration Law, Radboud University Nijmegen