FTR-FIPPSB107
Rhetoric and Debate
Course infoSchedule
Course moduleFTR-FIPPSB107
Credits (ECTS)5
Category-
Language of instructionEnglish
Offered byRadboud University; Faculty of Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies; Opleiding Filosofie;
Lecturer(s)
Lecturer
dr. Y.M. de Boer
Other course modules lecturer
Contactperson for the course
dr. A.S. Kleinherenbrink
Other course modules lecturer
Examiner
dr. A.S. Kleinherenbrink
Other course modules lecturer
Lecturer
dr. A.S. Kleinherenbrink
Other course modules lecturer
Lecturer
A. McInerney
Other course modules lecturer
Academic year2023
Period
SEM2  (29/01/2024 to 01/09/2024)
Starting block
SEM2
Course mode
full-time
Remarks-
Registration using OSIRISYes
Course open to students from other facultiesNo
Pre-registrationNo
Waiting listNo
Placement procedure-
Aims
During the course, you:
  • acquaint yourself with some basic theories and techniques in rhetoric and argument analysis;
  • apply those theories and techniques in an analysis of a public debate;
  • train your own rhetorical skills.
This contributes to the overall aim of the course, namely that you:
  • learn to use rhetorical theories and techniques to prepare a philosophically informed and rhetorically sound presentation and / or written analysis.
Content
Every fact, value, or idea vitally depends on being communicated effectively. Even the 'Absolute Truth', if such a thing exists, would remain obscure if it nobody would make the effort to persuasively argue in its favor.
 
The study of effective speaking and writing is called rhetoric. Studying rhetoric greatly increases your understanding of the ocean of communication in which you are submerged on a daily basis – ranging from theories to commercials, and from private conversations to public debates.
 
This course teaches you the fundamentals of rhetoric and argument analysis. You learn to apply those theories and techniques in practice: first, by analyzing a public debate; second, by shaping and presenting your own philosophically informed position in that debate in a rhetorically sound way.
 
At the beginning of the course, you select a public debate that you want to work on during the semester. Through a series of assignments (at home) and exercises (in class), you analyze the arguments and the rhetoric that characterize it. This leads up to a final presentation in which you use your findings to take up your own position in that debate. 
Level

Presumed foreknowledge

Test information
Presentation for a live audience
Specifics

Instructional modes
Seminar
Attendance MandatoryYes

Tests
Presentation
Test weight1
Test typePresentation
OpportunitiesBlock SEM2, Block SEM2